Research

High protein diet said to increase heart failure risk in middle-aged men slightly

Findings published in journal Circulation: Heart Failure

In a recently published study scientists have revealed that high protein diet could increase heart failure risk in middle-aged men slightly; however, proteins from fish and eggs were not associated with heart failure risk in this study.

Scientists say that despite the popularity of high protein diets, there is little research about how diets high in protein might impact men’s heart failure risk. For the study scientists studied, 2,441 men, age 42 to 60, at the study’s start and followed them for an average 22 years. Overall, researchers found 334 cases of heart failure were diagnosed during the study and 70 percent of the protein consumed was from animal sources and 27.7 percent from plant sources. Higher intake of protein from most dietary sources, was associated with slightly higher risk. Only proteins from fish and eggs were not associated with heart failure risk in this study, researchers said.

For this study, researchers divided the men into four groups based on their daily protein consumption. When they compared men who ate the most protein to those who ate the least, they found their risk of heart failure was:

  • 33 percent higher for all sources of protein;
  • 43 percent higher for animal protein;
  • 49 percent higher for dairy protein.
  • 17 percent higher for plant protein.

“As this is one of the first studies reporting on the association between dietary protein and heart failure risk, more research is needed before we know whether moderating protein intake may be beneficial in the prevention of heart failure,” said Heli E.K. Virtanen, MSc, first author of study, PhD student and early career researcher at the University of Eastern Finland in Kuopio. “Long-term interventions comparing diets with differential protein compositions and emphasizing differential protein sources would be important to reveal possible effects of protein intake on risk factors of heart failure. More research is also needed in other study populations.”

Steven Anderson

Steven has over 10 years of experience in online media industry at various positions throughout the editorial cycle. Because of his interest in presenting scientific knowledge to the general public as well as providing a platform for information dissemination, Steven decided to bring together a team of like-minded individuals and started Top Health Journal.

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