Research

Poor sleeping habits increase the risk of diabetes and obesity, Research says

Are you a late night eater who likes to munch around on snacks? This apparently harmless habit may bring serious health problems to you in the long run. The risk increases more when you are a habitual night-time fridge raider. Stop it right away if you are doing it because you are putting your health at risk.

The latest research has shown that snacking beyond the bedtime may cause your skin to damage as it alters the production of a protective enzyme. But the more frightening fact is that late night snacking causes most of the metabolic diseases. The research shows a prominent increase in late night eaters associated with diabetes and heart problems.

The latest research from the University of Arizona in Tucson says that people who struggle a lot while trying to sleep are usually habitual of late night eating or munching at late hours. You may not know this but it is one of the biggest contributors towards obesity and diabetes.

The study results suggest that sleep deprivation causes food cravings at night especially junk and unhealthy snacks. It is a direct cause of weight gain, which is very obvious by the choice of food.

The study has provided an important answer about weight gain, metabolic diseases, and diabetes in people who eat their dinner at late night hours. These findings are a help to the real world where the disturbed lifestyle has made millions of people to eat at late hours.

These research findings were presented at SLEEP 2018 annual conference held among Associated Professional Sleep Societies, in Baltimore, MD. You can read the complete research along with its findings by clicking here.

How are junk food and poor sleeping habits related?

The date for this research was collected from a phone-based survey. In total, the sample size was 3,105 adults, collected from 23 metropolitan areas all across the United States.

In these surveys, the participants were questioned about their daily routine, late night snacking, sleep quality, quantity and any prevailing or pre existing health issues. These participants were also asked if they ever experienced sleep deprivation, which made them crave for junk food or any unhealthy snack.

Among all these participants, approximately 60 percent admitted that they munch on unhealthy snacks at late hours of the night on a regular basis. Only a 2/3rd of these participants told that sleeplessness made them crave for such choice of unhealthy snacking.

The researchers also checked that people who admitted to feel junk food cravings are more likely to raid to the refrigerator than normal people. The rate was almost double as compared to those who don’t. It is an alarming situation for these people to be on the verge of obesity and developing diabetes.

It was proven by research that sleep deprivation is a reliable predictor of junk food cravings especially snacks when this habit is directly associated with developing diabetes, metabolic disorders or obesity.

This link between poor sleeping habits and junk food cravings is necessary to be known by common people to understand how these simple habits can harm your health. It astonishes that between 50 and 70 million U.S. individuals are living with a sleep disorder. This data is taken from the official record of American Sleep Association and is an accurate representation.

After this new study, the importance of a regular, quality sleep and eating healthy are taken related to each other. The changes in any of these can impact the other factors, overall degrading the health.

Make sure that you are following a regular sleeping pattern and making better food choices. When it comes to health, remember a minor thing can take your body to an actual medical condition too. Improve your lifestyle by making these necessary changes.

 

Areeba Hussain

The author is a Medical Microbiologist and a healthcare writer. She is a post-graduate of Medical Microbiology and Immunology with distinction. She is an author of six research papers and currently working as a research associate in a Research Lab.

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