Research

Soft Drinks Can be Deteriorating for Health | Says Study

Soft Drinks- Who isn’t familiar with this word? In fact, soft drinks have become kind of an integral part of everyone’s life. From young to old, everyone likes to have soft drinks whether they are home or outside the home. Drinking soft drinks have become such a norm that hardly anyone bats an eye.  In fact, people have become so used to of it that they prefer drinking such drinks over water. Isn’t it something worrisome?

The real question comes here. How many people have actually pondered upon the side-effects of such drinks? Despite recurring warnings by professional health cares, people hardly listen to such warnings.

One of the fun-fact about the soft drinks is that many countries which include France, Britain and United States and in the United States, States like Miami, Philadelphia, and Los Angeles have banned on selling such soft drinks in schools. Kids cannot buy such drinks anymore

What do Soft Drinks Do to Our Body?

Many people who are quite naïve in such matters hardly know that what soft drinks can do to our body. Here’s what the study shows:

“In a systematic review and meta-analysis, 88 studies were taken for examination and the researchers tried finding the link between the intake of soft drinks and the outcomes of in taking such drinks as a consequence.

It was reported that people who take such drinks are likely to be amongst those who don’t drink milk, which in result makes them deprived of calcium as well as other essential nutrients that in result can cause people to become vulnerable to chronic illnesses such as diabetes.

Relation of Soft Drinks with Diseases

Soft Drinks can have an effect in a number of ways upon a person. The kind of chronic illnesses that a person is likely to develop are as follows:

  • People can likely become a victim of Diabetes.
  • The chances of getting heart attacks are increased.
  • Drinking such drinks can actually cause obesity in an individual.
  • The bones of people can actually start getting affected because of low or no essential nutrients.

The Link of Soft Drinks with Diabetes

It is reportedly said that people who drink one or more cans on a daily basis, then the risk of them getting Diabetes Type 2 becomes 26% higher.

A study was performed on almost 90,000 women. The study remained continued for almost eight years. The results of this study showed that women who used to take one or two cans a day of such soft drinks were likely to develop the type 2 diabetes two times more than the women who hardly took any such beverages.

Also, women or men who were used to of such casual soft drinks were also reported to have trouble with managing their blood sugar.

The Link of Soft Drinks with Heart Diseases

Not only can soft drinks cause a person to be vulnerable to diseases like diabetes. Such highly-sweetened drinks can also cause a person to become vulnerable to heart problems and diseases.

The study was performed on women and it was found that women who drank such drinks were 40% more at risk of developing heart diseases than the women who hardly had any such beverages.

The same women who drank such drinks were said to be more at risk of dying because of heart diseases than the women who didn’t take such beverages.

Effect of Soft Drinks on Bones

Bones can get affected because of drinking soft drinks. It is because such drinks contain phosphate in their ingredients and having more phosphate than calcium in the body can start deteriorating the state of bones.

During the early years or stages of an individual, having enough calcium in the body is necessary for the essential bone growth. Soft drinks can deprive the person of having such essential elements.

Conclusion

While concluding, it is suggested and advised to reduce the intake of soft drinks as much as possible. And instead, some other drinks like milk or healthy shakes should be inculcated in the diet of individuals.

References

  • https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/healthy-drinks/soft-drinks-and-disease/
  • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17329656

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